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Niclosamide - a promising treatment for COVID-19
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  • Shivani Singh,
  • Anne Weiss,
  • James Goodman,
  • Marie Fisk,
  • Spoorthy Kulkarni,
  • Ing Lu,
  • Joanna Gray,
  • Morten Sommer,
  • Joseph Cheriyan
Shivani Singh
New York University Grossman School of Medicine
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Anne Weiss
Danmarks Tekniske Universitet The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability
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James Goodman
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Marie Fisk
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Spoorthy Kulkarni
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Ing Lu
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Joanna Gray
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Morten Sommer
Danmarks Tekniske Universitet The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability
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Joseph Cheriyan
Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Abstract

Vaccines have reduced the transmission and severity of COVID-19 but there remains a paucity of efficacious treatment for drug resistant strains and more susceptible individuals. Repurposing existing drugs is a timely, safe and scientifically robust method for treating pandemics such as COVID-19. Here, we review the pharmacology and scientific rationale for repurposing niclosamide, an anti-helminth already in human use as a treatment for COVID-19. In addition to potent antiviral activity, niclosamide has shown pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, bronchodilatory and anticancer effects in numerous pre-clinical and early clinical studies. The advantages and rationale for nebulised and intranasal formulations of niclosamide, which target the site of primary infection in COVID-19, are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the TACTIC-E clinical trial, an international COVID-19 therapeutic platform trial for the use of licensed and novel therapeutic agents, which is investigating niclosamide as a promising candidate against SARS-CoV-2.

Peer review status:UNDER REVIEW

13 Sep 2021Submitted to British Journal of Pharmacology
27 Sep 2021Assigned to Editor
27 Sep 2021Submission Checks Completed
12 Oct 2021Reviewer(s) Assigned