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Remote Sensing of Tundra Ecosystems using High Spectral Resolution Reflectance: Opportunities and Challenges
  • +18
  • Peter R Nelson,
  • Andrew J Maguire,
  • Zoe Pierrat,
  • Erica L Orcutt,
  • Dedi Yang,
  • Shawn Serbin,
  • Gerald V Frost,
  • Matthew J Macander,
  • Troy S Magney,
  • David R Thompson,
  • Jonathan A Wang,
  • Steven F Oberbauer,
  • Sergio Vargas Zesati,
  • Scott J Davidson,
  • Howard E Epstein,
  • Steven Unger,
  • Petya K E Campbell,
  • Nimrod Carmon,
  • Miguel Velez-Reyes,
  • K Fred Huemmrich,
  • Gov
Peter R Nelson
Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park
Andrew J Maguire
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
Zoe Pierrat
University of California
Erica L Orcutt
University of California
Dedi Yang
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Shawn Serbin
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Gerald V Frost
University of Maryland Baltimore County, Alaska Biological Research, Inc. Fairbanks
Matthew J Macander
University of Maryland Baltimore County, Alaska Biological Research, Inc. Fairbanks
Troy S Magney
University of California
David R Thompson
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
Jonathan A Wang
University of California
Steven F Oberbauer
Florida International University
Sergio Vargas Zesati
University of Texas at El
Scott J Davidson
University of Waterloo, University of Plymouth
Howard E Epstein
University of Virginia
Steven Unger
Florida International University
Petya K E Campbell
Nimrod Carmon
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
Miguel Velez-Reyes
University of Waterloo
K Fred Huemmrich
Gov

Abstract

Observing the environment in the vast inaccessible regions of Earth through remote sensing platforms provides the tools to measure ecological dynamics. The Arctic tundra biome, one of the largest inaccessible terrestrial biomes on Earth, requires remote sensing across multiple spatial and temporal scales, from towers to satellites, particularly those equipped for imaging spectroscopy (IS). We describe a rationale for using IS derived from advances in our understanding of Arctic tundra vegetation communities and their interaction with the environment.